Kanye West And The Double Hustle

Kanye West is a small player in a sprawling, decades old play that’s seldom seen for what it truly is. The Double Hustle’s features are 1) real and genuine oppression; 2) mass, mostly justified grievances; 3) white hot media fascination; 4) obsession with celebrities who use their “platforms” to speak on behalf of the movement; 5) black politicians following instead of leading; 6) the inevitable wane and disappointment; and, lastly, 7) "non-commensurate victory conditions," when “winning” for black people has a higher bar and a higher cost than it does for any other groups with which we claim solidarity.

Advertisements

Project LinX 10/06/2018 — Gas Mask

A lot more people think they’re middle-class than actually are. This is because “middle-class” is as much an ideology as it is a salary range. By “ideology” I mean a “way of thinking” that justifies how one thinks and acts. It’s interesting that neither “lower-class” nor “upper-class” are ideologies. Neither has need for it. Both understand the true nature of class warfare. It's crucial that the middle class remains oblivious.

What We (Don’t) See When We (Don’t) See Institutional Racism

There's definitely some sense in which the Protestant work ethic has been used to explain and justify entrenched racial inequities that also benefit those doing the explaining. That hard-working black people have held the same values as everyone else for generations is inconvenient and can’t have anything to do with the reverberating effects of, for instance, systemic housing discrimination since the 1940s.