The Daily DeX: News Notes And Quotes 05/015/2019

"The impact of surveillance technologies on culture, politics, and even our values has been my jam for a long time. Of particular interest are the accelerating transitions from science-fictiony possibilities that horrify us to everyday realities that tame us. For instituting such breathless control, China provides the blueprint for what it's leaders cynically call “managed democracy.” As I’ve written before, whatever Orwellian tactic emerges in China does not stay in China. It propagates to other totalitarian regimes across the globe. We’ll even see a slow totalitarian creep in “open” societies like Great Britain (which doesn’t have strong free speech and personal privacy protections) before we see it here. Thanks to a virtually unregulated tech sector, the American version will be brought to us by major corporations that fatten 401Ks, and small, shrouded research firms that spin themselves as techno-utopians. The difference between China’s brute force authoritarian control and its American cousin is that the latter will be more subtle and opaque—a soft (or “inverted”) totalitarianism, as Sheldon Wolin called it—that produces capital as well as control by harvesting then leveraging even more of our data than it does now."

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The Daily DeX: News, Notes, And Quotes For 04/27/2019

"I don’t normally do this kind of thing, but, given the arrest of Julian Assange last week, and the awkward and cowardly responses thereto, I felt it necessary to abandon my customary literary standards and spew out a spineless, hypocritical “hot take” professing my concern about the dangerous precedent the U.S. government may be setting by extraditing and prosecuting a publisher for exposing American war crimes and such, while at the same time making it abundantly clear how much I personally loathe Assange, and consider him an enemy of America, and freedom, and want the authorities to crush him like a cockroach."

No One Really Gets It About WikiLeaks

"We can’t properly price secrecy until secrets are revealed. Until then we substitute a strange hybrid of fear, propaganda, faith, hope, and taxes for the price of national security, which has nothing to do with the real price of secrecy. Therefore, as a hedge against the risk of secrets that compromise our rights and citizenship, secrecy itself should at least be priced high for those who control it. And necessarily so because we can never really know just they know. This is the only real source of balance of power that the people have—assuming that there’s really such a thing as “the people” anymore."